Novel Coronavirus Resources

Every day there is new information coming out about the novel (new) coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Some of this information is science-based and factual, while some is rumor or fiction. When looking for information, it is best to be careful and to check your sources. The following is a list of reputable sources for information on a local, national, and global level.

Share this page with your colleagues, friends and family as it will continue to be updated with new highlights as they become available.

Indiana

The IN.gov Coronavirus Hub contains links to current press releases from Governor Holcomb, as well as a dashboard containing a county-level breakdown of the number of cases, deaths, and tests being counted in Indiana.

  • from IN.gov: “General questions from the public or healthcare provider inquiries about COVID-19 may be directed to the ISDH COVID-19 Call Center at the toll-free number: 877-826-0011 (8 a.m. to midnight, daily)” 

Be Well Indiana: “This site is an initiative of the Indiana Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA). All external links have been provided by and vetted by DMHA leadership.Information on this website is up to date and subject to change.”

from IUhealth.org: “IU Health has launched a virtual clinic to offer individuals in Indiana regardless of age free Coronavirus (COVID-19) screenings using the IU Health Virtual Visit app. Staffed 24/7 with IU Health physicians, advance practice providers and registered nurses, the clinic will screen patients from home, potentially eliminating the need to visit physician offices, urgent cares or emergency departments.”

United States

The Centers For Disease Control (CDC) has a Coronavirus page which branches out into guidance for different situations and answers questions about staying safe and healthy.

The World

The World Health Organization (WHO) Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Pandemic page is compiling information about the disease from across the globe to better understand the situation.

Medical Journals & Articles

Resources for Individuals with ASD and More

Seniors with ASD

What information is available on how to support seniors with ASD?

Currently, not much information is available on how to support seniors with ASD. However, we know that age and severity of autism are tightly linked, where the severity of autism tends to grow with age across such situations as social communication, coping with change or generating new ideas or solutions (Charlton, 2016). But here are some resources:

Considerations for Medical Transition

What is healthcare transition?

Healthcare transition is an individualized process used to address the comprehensive health care needs of children as they age into adulthood and is designed to maximize lifelong functioning and potential by providing patient-centered care during that transition (Rast et al., 2018).

Why does healthcare transition and healthcare plan improve outcomes?

Improved healthcare transition and comprehensive health care can improve the health outcomes of individuals with ASD. Yet, fewer than 10% of youth with ASD meet the national transition core outcome (Walsh et al., 2017). Young people with special health care needs, including autism, often have:

  • more outpatient and inpatient hospital visits that are longer in mean duration,
  • more emergency department visits,
  • more primary care and psychiatric visits,
  • more health care claims, and
  • higher health care expenditures than their peers (Rast et al., 2018).

Transfer to Adult Care

What is a recommended healthcare transition timeline for providers?

Recommended Health Care Transition Timeline for Providers is as follows:

  • Age 12: Make youth and family aware of transition policy
  • Age 14: Initiate health care transition planning
  • Age 16: Prepare youth and parents for adult model of care and discuss transfer
  • Age 18: Transition to adult model of care
  • Age 18-22: Transfer care to adult medical home and/or specialists with transfer package
  • Age 23-26: Integrate young adults into adult care

Source: Got Transition?

Are You Ready for Transition to Adult Health Care?

Check out Got Transition?

Additional Resources:

Health Care Transitions FAQ

Medical Concerns in Adulthood

What predisposition to disorders do individuals with ASD have?:

Adults with ASD may face an increased risk for immune disorders (e.g., allergies or asthma); metabolic disorders (e.g., diabetes); heart disease; and motor disorders (e.g., cerebral palsy) (Croen et al., 2015). Here is more information:

  • Immunology: Presence of an autoimmune disorder in early childhood may increase the risk of development ASD in later life, as well as strongly correlated with the severity of communication challenges
  • Asthma: 1.6 times more likely
  • Frequent and/or severe headaches: 1.8 times more likely
  • Chronic sleep problems: Over 50% of individuals with ASD have one or more sleep issues
  • Chronic gastrointestinal disorders: 8 times more likely, including chronic constipation or diarrhea. Additionally, individuals with ASD have higher food selectivity
  • Epilepsy: Approximately one-third of people with ASD have a seizure disorder.
  • Incontinence: Children with ASD may have nocturnal enuresis and daytime urinary incontinence more frequently than their peers.
  • Obesity: People with ASD are 1.4 times more likely to be obese and about 3 times more likely to have constipation. These problems could be related to picky eating and/or a common side effect of drugs often prescribed to individuals with ASD.

 

Inclusion and feeling part of society really does impact on health status. It’s very important to include adults with autism in all sections of society.” 
~ Lisa Croen

What barriers to healthcare can individuals with ASD face?

Many young adults with ASD do not receive any healthcare for years after they stop seeing a pediatrician. Indeed, primary health care providers often admit to being unprepared to work with individuals with ASD.

Within a survey of nearly 1,000 primary care physicians and other healthcare professionals,  a majority of respondents reported having never received the training needed to care for adults with ASD. Healthcare professionals also greatly underestimate the number of adults with ASD in their practices. For example, one doctor commented that it does not concern him how to treat people with autism as he is not a pediatrician.

Resources:

 

 

Medical Health Problems

What medical and health problems do individuals with ASD experience?

  • Immunology: Presence of an autoimmune disorder in early childhood may increase the risk of development ASD in later life, as well as strongly correlated with the severity of communication challenges
  • Asthma: 1.6 times more likely
  • Frequent and/or severe headaches: 1.8 times more likely
  • Chronic sleep problems: Over 50% of individuals with ASD have one or more sleep issues
  • Chronic gastrointestinal disorders: 8 times more likely, including chronic constipation or diarrhea. Additionally, individuals with ASD have higher food selectivity
  • Epilepsy: Approximately one-third of people with ASD have a seizure disorder.
  • Incontinence: Children with ASD may have nocturnal enuresis and daytime urinary incontinence more frequently than their peers.